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afternoon. they use files to share information about her and a place where she keeps her personal information. she has advanced directives, medical records, and so on that is not accessible to everybody in the network, but some of the members. there are stories and photos, a place where people can celebrate today, how to share memories, have the good times that were the essence in the past and in the present. you might be asking yourself this question, if you are a facebook user, how is different from facebook. it is what we called open social networking, and it is designed to create many relationships. this is closed and personal, it is an intimate space. i have a daughter that was close to 1000 facebook friends. it has no advertisements. no data mining, it is private and secure. it bridges the formal and informal world of care and support. and what we have discovered is that people that use a, what they get out of that is what we call the network of fact. we have jill in the center of the network and you can see on the upper side where you have a health care provider to put info
a, one of our breakout sessions. take this opportunity to use the west -- the restaurant and find your own way. thank you. -- rest room and find your own way. thank you. but the anniversary of the great earthquake was remembered. >> i would like to ask for a minute of silence. >> let's have a moment of silence. >> they meet for the annual reflating ceremony. he was joined by winnie for an afternoon celebration. we are here to commemorate all that it signifies. at each anniversary the leaders meet to prepare for the next great quake. bob welcome everybody to the anniversary. i got to say, the mayor gets it done. gooa round of applause for our e chief's wife. you look terrific. do we have sydney close five? -- close by. we will pass the microphone to the mayor for a couple of quick words. we have a fire chief and the police chief. >> good morning, everyone. 106 years since our earthquake. we do have a grandson? she was with us in 2009. goopublic works is here. this reminds us of the 3000 people but passed away in 1906 from the devastating earthquake, but the rebirth of our city is w
them out there and spend time with these folks day in and day out, not only built trust between us and the afghans but it gave them the ability to prg on a daily basis. so the other frustration was the coalition effort. there was a lot of people with great intentions willing to help shared by many different countries. the frustration was many different countries, there's many different ways of doing things. so we would be out there telling the afghans, this is how you conduct police operations, this is how we do police training, this is how you hold your weapon and engage the enemy, and then several weeks later another force would come in and not that it was necessarily wrong, but it was different. so from the afghan perspective, incredibly frustrating to understand where they are going and what they need to be doing and what is right and what is wrong. so in closing if someone were to ask me from 2010 to where we're at now, is there hope i would say, yes, there is. as we stand down our combat forces and shift to an advisory and a training role i think we're going to be able to
in and day out, not only built trust between us and the afghans but it gave them the ability to prg on a daily basis. so the other frustration was the coalition effort. there was a lot of people with great intentions willing to help shared by many different countries. the frustration was many different countries, there's many different ways of doing things. so we would be out there telling the afghans, this is how you conduct police operations, this is how we do police training, this is how you hold your weapon and engage the enemy, and then several weeks later another force would come in and not that it was necessarily wrong, but it was different. so from the afghan perspective, incredibly frustrating to understand where they are going and what they need to be doing and what is right and what is wrong. so in closing if someone were to ask me from 2010 to where we're at now, is there hope i would say, yes, there is. as we stand down our combat forces and shift to an advisory and a training role i think we're going to be able to take our lessons lerbed -- learned and ensure that
out, not only built trust between us and the afghans but it gave them the ability to prg on a daily basis. so the other frustration was the coalition effort. there was a lot of people with great intentions willing to help shared by many different countries. the frustration was many different countries, there's many different ways of doing things. so we would be out there telling the afghans, this is how you conduct police operations, this is how we do police training, this is how you hold your weapon and engage the enemy, and then several weeks later another force would come in and not that it was necessarily wrong, but it was different. so from the afghan perspective, incredibly frustrating to understand where they are going and what they need to be doing and what is right and what is wrong. so in closing if someone were to ask me from 2010 to where we're at now, is there hope i would say, yes, there is. as we stand down our combat forces and shift to an advisory and a training role i think we're going to be able to take our lessons lerbed -- learned and ensure that we can con
and this offered us a venue to be able to conduct a humanitarian and disaster relief exercise with all the different partners that we had together and collaborating with this exercise, this offered a perfect opportunity for us to introduce the military capabilities and interaction in exchange with our civil military partners as well. the exercise was located on oh oahu we had used that island as a fictitious island of chianti where we wanted to do a humanitarian response but it also provided us an avenue for the state-wide partners, the civil hawaiian partners, to be able to exercise their exercise as well. this exercise also allowed us the opportunity to intro daus a lot of technology to help with the interoperatability of the civil military exercise. one of the main goals that we had for this was to allow our military a crisis response adaptive force package and opportunity to allow their training and certification in providing the most appropriate military expeditionary force for that scenario. one of the things that we realize in the military when we do these exercises in a foreig
>> welcome to city hall. thank you for joining us. thank you for coming out. i want to thank members of the board of supervisors. i want to thank them for being here in this joint recognition of our commissioners and members of 14 different bodies that will be appointed today to committees and commissions. i want to thank all the friends and family for joining us. let me say how excited i am this past week, i have been watching a certain convention. next week, we will have an even more exciting convention to watch. it is of course, in the spirit of the expected national, regional, and state elections we are preparing for. it is also a reminder of the importance of our civic duty and all the different departments we have created. public engagement is extremely important to the way we run government in san francisco. it has always been about public engagement. we need the last bodies come a different viewpoints, different economic classics -- classes, ethnicities, and regions of the city to be well-represented on everything we do because that is what makes our city great. it is
earthquake. we do have a grandson? she was with us in 2009. goopublic works is here. this reminds us of the 3000 people but passed away in 1906 from the devastating earthquake, but the rebirth of our city is with us. i have been in all of these other positions where we are always prepared. and we are already engaged in recovery efforts. we were there with a whole staff. we have six we assure you that when the next big event happens, that water system will be there for us to deliver water with that 24 hours. a huge change from depending on this fountain. we are handing it off to generations of youth in the city to understand -- make sure they're prepared. go to our website, it tells you all the things there. iti is about having those items prepared.w we will survive. that is how we get ready and celebrate and honor the people who left us and make sure our city is ready. thank you for being here. congratulations to our survivors. >> very nice job. behind me is a good friend and a great firechief. you go back 106 years. braxton morning. -- good morning. one of the survivors could not be
and a dancing together across every conceivable and imaginable difference. i have believed the world looks to us to say it is -- if it is possible to live together across every conceivable difference. we're proud of our home and place in history and proud of our example. but we also are humble in the context of the world we're living in. a world that is another connected but hyper-connected with a merger of i.t. and globalization. we recognize our faith -- fate is connected to the fate of others. that is the spirit that binds us together. the spirit that brings us here today. i want to close by reminding you that california is the birthplace as mayor lee was saying of life science, biotech, the home of the california stem cell institute, a state with more engineers, more scientists, more global -- nobel laureate's than any other state or we still lay claim to five of the top universities based on the shanghai index in the world. caltech, stanford university, and three of our public universities, not least of which the university is a stone's throw away. uc-berkeley campus. we're proud of the sta
and residents facilities to encourage older adults to get more involved with physical activity using technology. we're going to spend the first 30 minutes or so demonstrating the wii. not only will we demonstrate how to use it, but we will doe demonstrate adaptive devices so that it can be an inclusive activity for all adults and children. my name is dr. chris thompson from the university of san francisco. go, dons. 1855. i have not been there that long. i am in the department of exercise and sports science. i think it is a good match for me to be demonstrating the wii, which is a good physical activity. i am joined on the stage by a student, not from usf, but from san francisco state. we actually talk to each other. this is mackenna. >> good morning. >> finally, i am joined by alicia from the independent living center in san francisco. it is great for all of you to be here today. people will be trickling in over the next half hour. we will give you a taste of what wii is like. we have set up the game. i will start by playing mackeena in a game of tennis. the interesting thing about wii is we u
from them and tep and transit effective project and shared with us and compleated in 2008 and list of solutions similar to those proposed by transportation consultants with whom we spoke. the muni managers we finally did speak with shared the fact that the 2008tep plan has been halted to budgetary concerns and was now only being partially implemented. in our report we acknowledge the resurrection of 2008tep as a step forward from muni and encouraged the expansion of it to speed up muni and ways to avoid switchbacks. in summary the 2011-2012 grand jury conducted a survey of other systems and four of which had higher rider satisfaction ratings than muni. we found that the use of switchbacks was not a commonly used practice of all systems and rejected by the managers who felt they're an sult to passengers and rather the other systems use variety and easy and low cost practices to ensure rider satisfaction. many are similar to those identified in muni's 2008 effectiveness transit project. unfortunately although it has been resurrected it hasn't been updated and recommendations are on
, it is something that we have talked about. it is important for us to understand what the cbos are doing. it is important for them to have specific training for their individuals. they should also have some guidelines and some criteria to evaluate their successes, on a quarterly and yearly basis. >> thank you. last question. what are the types of job opportunities that are available for at risk youth? what are the funding opportunities? >> there are not many job opportunities right now. with the way that funding is currently, it is only being reduced. what we try to do is think creative. we try to create an internship programs, where we try to confuse -- infuse youth. we utilize a lot of non-western ways of trying to have youth identified. we infuse political education so they can make a good choice. there are other programs like oasis. there are not many opportunities, not everybody could work -- all the work permits required. it also requires a social security number. alternative pathways are a good way to go, such as those internship opportunities. use these venues as an opportunity t
using technology. we're going to spend the first 30 minutes or so demonstrating the wii. not only will we demonstrate how to use it, but we will doe demonstrate adaptive devices so that it can be an inclusive activity for all adults and children. my name is dr. chris thompson from the university of san francisco. go, dons. 1855. i have not been there that long. i am in the department of exercise and sports science. i think it is a good match for me to be demonstrating the wii, which is a good physical activity. i am joined on the stage by a student, not from usf, but from san francisco state. we actually talk to each other. this is mackenna. >> good morning. >> finally, i am joined by alicia from the independent living center in san francisco. it is great for all of you to be here today. people will be trickling in over the next half hour. we will give you a taste of what wii is like. we have set up the game. i will start by playing mackeena in a game of tennis. the interesting thing about wii is we use this little remote. just by moving our arms, we can control movement on the sc
this time, and all of a sudden it's an issue now so that is interesting and the use is not changing from what it's been but the use is not technically what they have been asking for. they need the approval by us to have their use to conform to what we're doing as opposed to the previous cu which was more limited -- although the distinction sometimes is rather vague because we went through the same thing at westportal and the proprietor suffered a fire and not in business anymore but we went through conditions in that case had real specifications and you will only have so many chairs and strict conditions. i don't remember in 2005 -- there could be 20 people have a wine tasting at the same time under the approval of 2005. i can't recall a specific limitation on the tasting going on, but with that being said there is a lot of local support for it. there are some people speaking against it again and there are a couple neighborhood groups just recently come out against it. they may not have been in support at any time but recently we're hearing they're opposing it, but you always have to
at the future. we are taking a look at some of the most exciting technologies in elevators. george, tell us about destination elevators. >> this is the technology of the future. probably the biggest single investment in elevators. san francisco has embraced the technology more than any other city in the country. a big advantage with us is passengers get to their floors sooner and there is more opportunity of customization of features for individual service. four issues of security and accessibility, this is a big advantage over traditional elevators. digest i understand these are rehabilitated upgrades of existing elevators? >> yes, these are upgrades to the original elevators from 1980. all the controls and wiring has changed but the physical mechanisms are the same. >> how much energy to these use? >> with all of the things that we did hear, energy savings is about 50% from where we started. that is a significant improvement for such a major system. >> tell me how it works. >> this is the hall keypad, which controls the elevator. the system asks where you are going before you get into the
neighborhood of seattle, washington. his parents immigrated to the u.s. from china and the 1930's. his father fought in world war ii and worked as a cook. he passed away when the mayor was 15. his mother was a seamstress and a waitress. mayor lee has five siblings, he graduated from college in maine, he also went to uc- berkeley law school and finished in 1978. he and his wife have two daughters. i also want to mention, prior to becoming mayor, one of the key points in his contributions to the community is after he completed law school, he worked as a managing attorney for the san francisco asian law caucus, where he was an advocate for affordable housing and the rights of immigrants and renters. mayor lee -- [applause] >> thank you. welcome to city hall. the people's city hall, san francisco. i want you all to note that that was such a wonderful rendition of our national anthem. please give another applause to the millennium -- melanie and her daughter. i am so excited about all of you and seen so many of you from all over our state. come to city hall anin san francisco, welcome. i would lik
. there is a circus company that i have been fortunate enough to work with the last couple of years. i use elements of dance and choreography and combine that with theater techniques. a lot of the work is content- based, has a strong narrative. the dancers have more of a theatrical feel. i think we are best known for our specific work. in the last 15 years, spending a lot of time focusing on issues that affect us and are related to the african-american experience, here in the united states. i had heard of marcus shelby and had been in join his work but never had the opportunity to meet him. we were brought together by the equal justice society specifically for this project. we were charged with beginning work. marquez and i spent a lot of time addressing our own position on the death penalty, our experiences with people who had been incarcerated, family members, friends of friends. pulling our information. beyond that, we did our own research. to create a picture that resonated with humanity. it is the shape of a house. in this context, it is also small and acts like a cell. i thought that was an i
, and our country has presented, a challenge to us for our seniors and the need for long-term care. we're going to be working closely with the long term care coordinating council. thank you, tracy. [applause] thank you for stepping up. and for teaching me how to pronounce your name. our mta newest member to the board of directors and one that i know will be of great value to us as we are challenged with everybody being able to enjoy all the services our mta has. thank you, christina, for stepping up. [applause] as we move into the times when we want more people to come in, we want development to create jobs, we need to make sure we appropriately plan all areas of the city. i want to thank these two gentlemen for stepping up to come and spend hours of their personal time helping us with the planning of the city. michael, thank you for returning and stepping forward for the planning commission. richard, thank you very much for stepping up as well. some say the most voluble land we have -- valuable land we have for people to live and enjoy is the waterfront. i want to thank our newest
of us, or none of us, and that is the bottom line. it has to be that mentality. >> it is a way to control the prisoners. it takes the pressure off the guards and everybody else. they say we want to stop violence, but you promote a violence by segregating. when an individual comes, the first in the asking, where are you from? what is your nationality? that is how to divide and conquer. that is the way the united states is made up. that is how you work. north and south vietnam, for instance. they divide people so that the pressure will not be on them. that is how i see the system. i see it in prison, how they divide inmates. it is scary if inmates unite, and they do not like that. when i first come to prison, it will be a big thing if i went and sat with the blacks. it would be a big think if they caucasian sat with the asians. we only did that one time, where everybody got together, and we got what we wanted. when you unite, you can conquer. [applause] >> next question is for the commander. how can they community-based organization contact the task force for speaking engagements
company that i have been fortunate enough to work with the last couple of years. i use elements of dance and choreography and combine that with theater techniques. a lot of the work is content- based, has a strong narrative. the dancers have more of a theatrical feel. i think we are best known for our specific work. in the last 15 years, spending a lot of time focusing on issues that affect us and are related to the african-american experience, here in the united states. i had heard of marcus shelby and had been in join his work but never had the opportunity to meet him. we were brought together by the equal justice society specifically for this project. we were charged with beginning work. marquez and i spent a lot of time addressing our own position on the death penalty, our experiences with people who had been incarcerated, family members, friends of friends. pulling our information. beyond that, we did our own research. to create a picture that resonated with humanity. it is the shape of a house. in this context, it is also small and acts like a cell. i thought that was an interestin
the women. so we created the female engagement team. with our interagency partners, the u.s. department of state, danish and british governments and of course the afghans, additionally we reached out to the private sector for partnerships, and not for profits to deliver things that we weren't capable of delivering or to cover gaps that arose as we implemented the plan. we implemented the plan through 17 teams through helman and our two female engagement teams. this is actually just scrolling pictures. sometimes a picture says a thousand words and i don't want to take you down the whole history of a year but i wanted to talk to you about how we framed this plan. this plan was framed into 5 pillars and the 5 pillars were students and parents, we attempted to build buy in and assure safety among the students. there was lots of fear of reprisals. by sending your kids to school there was fear that the taliban was going to knock on your door and let you know that that wasn't allowed. previously the taliban had instituted a medrossas so their only forms of education were religious schools
command air control. those are operations that are familiar to us and they are, it's a great exercise for us tactically as well. we are able to integrate with cal fire itself with the objective being the fire itself. those work out for us here and we can go ahead and use those skills forward as well. thank you very much, we appreciate the opportunity. >> thank you, i'd like to thank our panelists and open it up to our group for any questions of our panelists today. yes, sir, secretary. >> there are a lot of things you can do in a forest that tend to make it easier it fight a fire like most importantly burning off the fuel during the wet season so there's less for the fire to feed on. to what extent in cal fire and all your other things do you encourage people to do things in their forest when you don't have a fire that make it easier and more effective in fighting the fire? >> it's an excellent question, sir. we spend a large time in cal fire on public education and prevention and also with respect to you were talking about fuel, the fuels program, or vegetation manage
is that it produces carbon free public power to the city of san francisco. one of my favorite lines mike just used is this measure is about consolidating from 8 reservoirs to 7. another way to say that is to say this is about draining one of them, the hetch hetchy valley. have other studies said this is feasible? sure, just like tearing down city hall or knocking down the golden gate bridge, that's possible but not feasible. we're not going to spend 3 billion dollars to tear down the hetch hetchy dam. let's not forget, we are also stewards for two dozen cities in the peninsula. over 2 million californians benefit from the foresight of our forefathers almost 100 years ago in building hetch hetchy. while the rest of the state is tying themselves up in knots trying to figure out where to get their water. not only did we have the type of water storage hetch hetchy provides, not only today but in the future, we are in a solid place. and to spend this kind of money, and let's just talk about the $8 million dollars, i think that's one thing we can agree on. this calls for us to spend $8 million do
. this is just really a big, community win and a celebration for us all. >> to learn more about the helen diller playground in dolores park, go to sfrecpark.org. >> welcome to city hall. thank you for joining us. thank you for coming out. i want to thank members of the board of supervisors. i want to thank them for being here in this joint recognition of our commissioners and members of 14 different bodies that will be appointed today to committees and commissions. i want to thank all the friends and family for joining us. let me say how excited i am this past week, i have been watching a certain convention. next week, we will have an even more exciting convention to watch. it is of course, in the spirit of the expected national, regional, and state elections we are preparing for. it is also a reminder of the importance of our civic duty and all the different departments we have created. public engagement is extremely important to the way we run government in san francisco. it has always been about public engagement. we need the last bodies come a different viewpoints, different economic classic
cut. to get our -- check out our blog. i will have >> welcome to city hall. thank you for joining us. thank you for coming out. i want to thank members of the board of supervisors. i want to thank them for being here in this joint recognition of our commissioners and members of 14 different bodies that will be appointed today to committees and commissions. i want to thank all the friends and family for joining us. let me say how excited i am this past week, i have been watching a certain convention. next week, we will have an even more exciting convention to watch. it is of course, in the spirit of the expected national, regional, and state elections we are preparing for. it is also a reminder of the importance of our civic duty and all the different departments we have created. public engagement is extremely important to the way we run government in san francisco. it has always been about public engagement. we need the last bodies come a different viewpoints, different economic classics -- classes, ethnicities, and regions of the city to be well-represented on everything we do becau
automobile creators to join us. today is a wonderful opportunity to do that with a bmw. any of you who noticed the labels in this city, you will certainly noticed the popularity of bmw as a corporation, not only a great company but one that is also on the cutting edge of the use of technology. i want to thank them and welcome them to not only the electric vehicle stage, which they have been working on, but also to this great program they are about to introduce, the drive now and park now technology. joined -- joining us in the car sharing program for their members who want to use bmw products. this idea of cars sharing has been a part of san francisco's objective in creating a more sharing economy. like many other cities, we are congested in our parking. parking is really a challenge in the city. for people who own vehicles, and introducing people to car- sharing programs and ideas have been a wonderful experiment for us. as you know, we have been working to create not only public garages but also in congested neighborhoods. when a private company like bmw registers their interest in c
of the area which $9 million will be used to fund open space improvementses in the chinatown neighborhood, which is one of the densest neighbors in the city adjacent to the downtown. and as such, growth in the plan area will have impacts on the need for additional open space in chinatown. there was a request at the joint hearing at parks and rec meeting we calendar this item to consider adding additional language to the implementation document to express priority for early investment from early impact fee revenues be directed towards open space improvementses in chinatown. as we are very timely. so, we put together this in draft lapping wa that is before you today for your consideration, and i'll just read what that language would say. the additional language would go under the implementation and responsibility section of the implementation document. and the language would state, notwithstanding the above growth in the plan area will create immediate needs for open space enhancements in chinatown. several open spaceses in the plan area such as oscar park will be implementedth in the near
on government data, you know, examples all over the place. if you look at the era in which the u.s. government opened up weather data. and not only did it have profound effect on public safety when there are storms coming and agriculture and some of the others, it just provides and helped the quality of life in a profound way, the global positioning system and... almost every night created, 100,000 in economic value. incredible opportunities for doing this in job creation and safety and quality of life and really improving the lives of americans. so it did develop the strategies of 30-plus page document to the agencies of government that they have to work up the data and they have to make this stuff available in the way that we collect it, and use it and public information should remain public and we are going to drive that forward. >> there are a lot of things in the strategy around and the use of mobile government and how we summarize the... and think about the 21st century government in that way. and the policy that launched a couple of weeks ago and so much more is being formed that i thin
that are familiar to us and they are, it's a great exercise for us tactically as well. we are able to integrate with cal fire itself with the objective being the fire itself. those work out for us here and we can go ahead and use those skills forward as well. thank you very much, we appreciate the opportunity. >> thank you, i'd like to thank our panelists and open it up to our group for any questions of our panelists today. yes, sir, secretary. >> there are a lot of things you can do in a forest that tend to make it easier it fight a fire like most importantly burning off the fuel during the wet season so there's less for the fire to feed on. to what extent in cal fire and all your other things do you encourage people to do things in their forest when you don't have a fire that make it easier and more effective in fighting the fire? >> it's an excellent question, sir. we spend a large time in cal fire on public education and prevention and also with respect to you were talking about fuel, the fuels program, or vegetation management program in cal fire, we have a robust program throughout
to all ages. when i was a kid growing up in new york, and we used to -- there is a statement, saving my ass. [laughter] if there is a question i hope you do not look at it as a challenge. i think it is a feeling. there are quite a few events in the park. it is really about managing them and making sure that your outreach is good. i would like to work together, wherever you are. i want to thank our panelists. i hope that you will as well. [applause] i hope that that gave you some food for thought, the idea here about things that we will talk about in the breakouts. we have got some food and beverage out there. i know that we have drinks, cookies, even sandwiches. it should be in room a, one of our breakout sessions. take this opportunity to use the west -- the restaurant and find your own way. thank you. -- rest room and find your own way. thank you. but the anniversary of the great earthquake was remembered. >> i would like to ask for a minute of silence. >> let's have a moment of silence. >> they meet for the annual reflating ceremony. he was joined by winnie for an afternoon celebrati
growing up in new york, and we used to -- there is a statement, saving my ass. [laughter] if there is a question i hope you do not look at it as a challenge. i think it is a feeling. there are quite a few events in the park. it is really about managing them and making sure that your outreach is good. i would like to work together, wherever you are. i want to thank our panelists. i hope that you will as well. [applause] i hope that that gave you some food for thought, the idea here about things that we will talk about in the breakouts. we have got some food and beverage out there. i know that we have drinks, cookies, even sandwiches. it should be in room a, one of our breakout sessions. take this opportunity to use the west -- the restaurant and find your own way. thank you. -- rest room and find your own way. thank you. but the anniversary of the great earthquake was remembered. >> i would like to ask for a minute of silence. >> let's have a moment of silence. >> they meet for the annual reflating ceremony. he was joined by winnie for an afternoon celebration. we are here
-year journey for the community. some of you have been with us from the start. today we join together the community, the faculty, the students, the staff, the business community and our neighbors and friends to start a new chapter in our history. we'd like to introduce john miso, president of our board of trustees. he has been with us for the last few years helping us with this project. he chairs the information committee that watches over this project, including our higher goals. >> trustee riso >> thank you. so how is everybody doing today? i thought so. you know, the opening of a new education facility is always a wonderful experience. a new facility dedicated to serving students as is city college. this particular educational facility, though, has a long history and struggle, a lot of false starts and reboots and now it's here. i've been working on this along with many other people for about 5 years and i just wanted to thank some of the people that i've been working with and i'm not going to mention everyone because there are so many people who have, are responsible for this
not continue advocating, if we do not have opportunities for you to speak out and for us to listen and to absorb and integrate into our policies, you'll have voices out there that suggest that the issues that women bring not our part -- to bring up our private matters. that cannot be accepted in a city like san francisco. [applause] i join you in recognizing international women's day. i thank you for this awards and recognition, but i want to make sure you are challenged and you are invited and you are encouraged to advocate to this administration. we will listen and we will act on those things to make sure we are more of an equal society and we can provide leadership to other areas of the country that have yet to catch up. thank you very much. [applause] >> we will make a first presentation. it is from an incredible artist. she is over in the corner. she has done a series of portraits murals of each of our honorees. it is our gift to you for all that you have done. we presented to you the ed lee mural. [applause] >> thank you. i understand you have other skills that i may need, li
one of the greats we know it's true for when you graced us -- our town of san francisco our golden sun will shine on new -- you ♪ [applause] mr. bennett. ♪ it only takes a tiny corner of this great big world to find a place that you love you have brought us so much joy you are a golden boy we love to have you here in our great towner of -- town of san francisco open your golden gates san francisco here is your wondering words singing other places only make me love you better you are the heart of all the gold in the world san francisco welcome me home again i'm coming home ♪ [applause] >> keep the applause going for the fabulous lisa malone. that was just terrific. [applause] i almost wore the same thing today. [laughter] would have been so awkward. [laughter] no, she was fantastic. now, everyone, without further ado, ladies and gentlemen, please welcome our host, the 43rd mayor of the city and county of san been cisco, the honorable edwin m. lee -- the 43rd mayor of the city and county of san francisco. [applause] mayor lee: wow, welcome to city hall. and thank you, beach blanket
graced us -- our town of san francisco our golden sun will shine on new -- you ♪ [applause] mr. bennett. ♪ it only takes a tiny corner of this great big world to find a place that you love you have brought us so much joy you are a golden boy we love to have you here in our great towner of -- town of san francisco open your golden gates san francisco here is your wondering words singing other places only make me love you better you are the heart of all the gold in the world san francisco welcome me home again i'm coming home ♪ [applause] >> keep the applause going for the fabulous lisa malone. that was just terrific. [applause] i almost wore the same thing today. [laughter] would have been so awkward. [laughter] no, she was fantastic. now, everyone, without further ado, ladies and gentlemen, please welcome our host, the 43rd mayor of the city and county of san been cisco, the honorable edwin m. lee -- the 43rd mayor of the city and county of san francisco. [applause] mayor lee: wow, welcome to city hall. and thank you, beach blanket babylon. what a wonderful performance. let's give h
they were forced to make their own instruments. >> (speaking spanish). >> so they use the surroundings and big jars and they used to have water or other type was drinks. >> (speaking spanish). >> covered with leather skin. >> (speaking spanish). >> and they make the drums. >>. >> (speaking spanish). (drums). (applause). >> (speaking spanish). >> this instrument is called dungo. >> spr (speaking spanish). >> we have two but only one was used. >> (speaking spanish). >> this is one that was used north of the capital. >> (speaking spanish). >> in the cities of the country >> (speaking spanish). >> when he was a child he was able to see those instruments and on extension today. (drums). (applause) . >> this is a donkey's jaw. it could be a horse or a donkey. >> donkey's jaw. >> and it's played by spiking it and to make the rattle sound and also creates this. (applause). >> (speaking spanish) sorry. (speaking spanish). >> this is the kahita and it is created as the -- i don't know that word. how do you say that? the piggy bank. you know where the boxes and the churches collect money? ye
they use the surroundings and big jars and they used to have water or other type was drinks. >> (speaking spanish). >> covered with leather skin. >> (speaking spanish). >> and they make the drums. >>. >> (speaking spanish). (drums). (applause). >> (speaking spanish). >> this instrument is called dungo. >> spr (speaking spanish). >> we have two but only one was used. >> (speaking spanish). >> this is one that was used north of the capital. >> (speaking spanish). >> in the cities of the country >> (speaking spanish). >> when he was a child he was able to see those instruments and on extension today. (drums). (applause) . >> this is a donkey's jaw. it could be a horse or a donkey. >> donkey's jaw. >> and it's played by spiking it and to make the rattle sound and also creates this. (applause). >> (speaking spanish) sorry. (speaking spanish). >> this is the kahita and it is created as the -- i don't know that word. how do you say that? the piggy bank. you know where the boxes and the churches collect money? yeah. this is the original he here. yeah. >> (speaking spanish) (laughing) (spea
). >> so they use the surroundings and big jars and they used to have water or other type was drinks. >> (speaking spanish). >> covered with leather skin. >> (speaking spanish). >> and they make the drums. >>. >> (speaking spanish). (drums). (applause). >> (speaking spanish). >> this instrument is called dungo. >> spr (speaking spanish). >> we have two but only one was used. >> (speaking spanish). >> this is one that was used north of the capital. >> (speaking spanish). >> in the cities of the country >> (speaking spanish). >> when he was a child he was able to see those instruments and on extension today. (drums). (applause) . >> this is a donkey's jaw. it could be a horse or a donkey. >> donkey's jaw. >> and it's played by spiking it and to make the rattle sound and also creates this. (applause). >> (speaking spanish) sorry. (speaking spanish). >> this is the kahita and it is created as the -- i don't know that word. how do you say that? the piggy bank. you know where the boxes and the churches collect money? yeah. this is the original he here. yeah. >> (speaking spanish) (l
not allow us to build a new hospital, right here on this site. it is our dream to have something to continue on for our future. but now, our dream is becoming a reality. i would like to bring up the one supporter, the friend, who helped us, the organization and the project, the mayor of san francisco ed lee. [ applause ] >> thank you, brend brenda. good morning, everyone, welcome to the chinese center, where the hospital has been since the late 1800s. this is history for all of us. it is history for our city. and those of you who know about that history, know that chinese hospice was built in a time when immigrants came here and faced discrimination. they faced a whole lot of barriers. they couldn't buy property. they couldn't get healthcare to people that were working in the gold mines and on the rail roads. and this is something that many generations of immigrants to come to this country have learned about, even in a wonderful city, and ininclusive city like san francisco. so it is in the backdrop that all of us have come together to support moderization of our central healthcare system. a
to work with the last couple of years. i use elements of dance and choreography and combine that with theater techniques. a lot of the work is content- based, has a strong narrative. the dancers have more of a theatrical feel. i think we are best known for our specific work. in the last 15 years, spending a lot of time focusing on issues that affect us and are related to the african-american experience, here in the united states. i had heard of marcus shelby and had been in join his work but never had the opportunity to meet him. we were brought together by the equal justice society specifically for this project. we were charged with beginning work. marquez and i spent a lot of time addressing our own position on the death penalty, our experiences with people who had been incarcerated, family members, friends of friends. pulling our information. beyond that, we did our own research. to create a picture that resonated with humanity. it is the shape of a house. in this context, it is also small and acts like a cell. i thought that was an interesting play on how these people ma
, radio technology, even before the planning we didn't know what they had. it took us several planning opportunities and meetings to flush through some of that information and one of the biggest take aways for us, as a city we're required to have a tactical interoperatable communications plan. it describes how you interoperate in an emergency or an event within the city as well as regional partners. we don't have that with military and i think that's one of the biggest take aways, we need to really flesh out a document so we have captured who our contacts are, what technology they are going to bring to the table and start that initial planning from the get-go. we also had some technical challenges with land mobile radio. you know, we have the coverage issues, but we were stationed at the san francisco police department command van, i had some very sharp people there who were able to work through a lot of those interoperatability issues so a huge thank you to the police department and also the fire department and sheriff's department were also there able to provide us with otherality
thanks to president chiu for moving us forward and i move that we forward it with a positive recommendation to the board. i also adopt the amendment. >> i also really appreciate the increase of awareness of these public open spaces from redwood park in the shadow of the transamerica pyramid to the incedible roof sun terraces at the crocker galleria. i see no other comments. can we adopt these amendments without objection, colleagues? thank you. and on the ordinance itself, can we support this with a positive recommendation without objection? thank you. thank you. thank you, president chiu. miss miller, is there any other business before us. >> no, there are no further matters. >> great, meeting adjourned. thank you, everyone. (meeting adjourned).>> be expee glass facades that was designed with over 120 laminated glass panels. it captures the experience of being under or over clouds when flying in a plane. depending on the distance or point of view, it can appear clear for more abstract and atmospheric. the subtle colors change gradually depending on the light and the time
of you could come out and join us, you know, on this evening. my namey. the director of the night rover challenge. i'm going to kind of be the moderator for tonight, as we go through this first-ever challenge america summit. so i've got just a few things that, you know, i wanted to do with everyone, before we get into the program. first of all, i just want to take a minute and have everyone just look around this room. in this room, we have amazing people that are corporate, nonprofit, and government, all focused on challenge driven innovation in some way or another. this is a really powerful,interf people that are gathered here to look at how competitions can drive innovation. that's what tonight is all about, is, you know, the next step in creating a real wave of innovation. my job tonight is just to give you a little bit of background on what we are, what we're tiqp)q)s that we have.roup of so just to get going with that, i want to tell you a little bit about this thing called the night rover/< challenge. this is a collaboration between the clean tech open, unoodle, and nasa. it's a p
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